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Bean: Why the Bruins have to move on from Tuukka Rask

Every year we have the, “is this their last run?” conversation, and every year the Bruins are back in the postseason. It’s clear they’ve got what it takes to get that far, but the current plan isn’t bringing them much more.

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Can’t believe you fell for that. In fairness, a lot of people scream “clickbait” at everything these days, so it’s about time someone actually did it. Anyway, let’s talk about that disaster of an end to the Bruins’ season.

It ended the way it was going to all along: by running into a team that could expose Boston’s lack of depth on forward and D. 

Someone was going to take advantage of the fact that the Bruins’ bottom-six and bottom-four were not championship caliber. That team should not have been the New York Islanders. 

So make it about Tuukka Rask all you want — he’s certainly part of the Bruins’ demise — but if you boil this season down to “Rask tailed off at the end of the series and now I get to say he’ll never win,” you’re dismissing why they actually lost. You’re also enabling the Bruins to stick to a roster construction that doesn’t work.

“Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat”

Since the Bruins blew it against the St. Louis Blues, they haven’t had good enough teams to win. They were clearly a paper tiger when they won the Presidents’ Trophy in 2019-20. This year, they bridged the gap by picking up Taylor Hall and Mike Reilly, but they’d also lost Torey Krug and Zdeno Chara the previous offseason while adding Craig Smith. 

On the strength of star power alone, the Bruins should have been able to beat the Islanders before being dismissed by the Tampa Bay Lightning. New York’s roster is not better, but it’s deeper. Boston’s bottom six was terrible this season, so that group struggling in the series could at least be expected.

The lack of serviceable depth on defense is what ultimately did them in, though. Once Brandon Carlo went out of the series in Game 3, the B’s became a circus in their own zone. 

An injured Rask’s job became to make up for Boston only having one reliable defensive pairing, but Matt Grzelcyk’s performance in Game 6 bumped that number down to zero. Grzelcyk got his pocket picked at the blue line to give Brock Nelson a breakaway goal, then got mugged in front by Kyle Palmieri to give New York its fourth goal of the evening. 

Now, Rask was right there with the rest of his teammates turning the puck over, as his pass to Mike Reilly before the Islanders’ third goal was reminiscent of Cam Newton whipping a short pass off his running back’s hands.

But when you look at an injured Rask not bailing out his teammates and most of the Bruins’ roster being subpar, which one is the problem? Which is more likely to continue being the problem if you only address the other? 

It’s the roster construction, and it starts with Boston’s inability to draft impact players. Charlie McAvoy is a No. 1 defenseman and Carlo, if healthy, is an important piece. That’s about it for Don Sweeney’s drafting.

The B’s let Krug and Chara walk because they figured they’d drafted enough guys that one or two of them would grow into a big role. None of them did. The best result of the experiment was Jeremy Lauzon, who was only in the lineup by season’s end because the B’s didn’t have anybody else. 

The Bruins left holes on their roster and hoped for the best because they had enough stars to get them through a round or two. It didn’t work and it won’t work if they try it again. 

The “big three” for Boston as it relates to signing its own guys is Hall, Rask and Krejci. They’ll have the dough to sign Hall to a team-friendly deal, but who is his center? It would be consistent with their handling of the defense this year to just hope Jack Studnicka can be a No. 2 center, but the smarter play is to bring back Krejci for another year or two.

As for Rask? Depending on his health and his desire to keep playing, the smartest play is to sign him for a year or two at $5 million per. That gives you a strong tandem while you figure out whether Jeremy Swayman is capable of taking over. Just giving the net to a good young player can be risky; look what happened with Philadelphia this year.

But this offseason won’t just be about who stays and goes. Boston absolutely must beef up its defense. We can rule out them signing the top free agent (great player you may have heard of; name rhymes with Shmuggy Shmamilton), but they need a good second-pairing defenseman (and perhaps then some to make sure they don’t get a repeat of this year). Reilly is a fine third-pairing defenseman, but he might get overpaid on the open market because he played well late in the regular season for Boston. 

The B’s also badly need some stability in their bottom six. Charlie Coyle had a down year but is worth keeping given Boston’s questions at center. Jake DeBrusk and Nick Ritchie are both expendable. DeBrusk makes sense to be exposed in the NHL Expansion Draft, while Ritchie is a restricted free agent whose postseason (one point in the final seven games) says buyer beware. The Bruins shouldn’t just walk away from Ritchie, but they should absolutely be willing to use him in a deal to get something more reliable. 

Boston’s fourth line was a mess all season. Getting Curtis Lazar helped, but Sean Kuraly and Chris Wagner had down years. Kuraly’s a free agent and Trent Frederic should be pushing for a full-time job. 

Every year we have the, “is this their last run?” conversation, and every year the Bruins are back in the postseason. It’s clear they’ve got what it takes to get that far, but the current plan isn’t bringing them much more.  

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Gronk Presents A Dilemma For The Top 50 Patriots List

Is Rob Gronkowski the greatest tight end in NFL history?

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Is Rob Gronkowski the greatest tight end in NFL history? Probably. In a 10-year NFL career, he’s caught 566 passes for 8,484 yards with 86 touchdowns. Add in the playoffs, where he’s got another 89 catches in 20 games for 1,273 yards and 14 more touchdowns.

Then add in the four All-Pro honors and the three Super Bowl rings (one in Tampa). And the fact he blocked like an extra offensive lineman, played hurt and was revered by teammates for his goofy authenticity?

It’s probably more than “probably” that he’s the best there’s ever been at the spot. It’s a fact.

A full-go Gronk in SB46 against the Giants? Any Gronk in the 2013 playoffs? A full-go Gronk down the stretch in 2015? The Patriots might have had six Super Bowls last decade, not the three they wound up with.

In May, Gronk turned 26. In his five-year NFL career he has 61 touchdowns in 73 NFL games (including playoffs). That’s .83 TDs/Game. In 189 games, San Diego’s Antonio Gates has scored 100 touchdowns (.53 TDs/Game). Surefire Hall of Fame Tony Gonzalez? He scored 115 in 277 games (.42). If Gronk can have their longevity – a large “if” for a player who’s been cut open way too much already – he won’t be threatening their tight end records. He’ll be a threat to get into the top five all-time and will retire the belt as the best tight end in NFL history.

That’s why Gronk is here in my Top 10 and players such as Willie McGinest and Rodney Harrison with more rings and leadership are behind Gronk. They were not threats to the record books. Gronk is. And he hasn’t even been fully healthy for an entire season yet. In the 2011 playoffs, Bernard Pollard broke Gronk in the AFC Championship Game. There’s no telling the difference he would have made in the Super Bowl, but imagine Victor Cruz not playing for the Giants that day. In 2012, he broke his arm in December and then re-broke it in the playoff win over Houston. And the Patriots offense went from potent to putrid and got shut down by the Ravens in the AFC Championship.

The 2013 Patriots probably wouldn’t have won a Super Bowl even with Gronk – Seattle was that good. Denver too. But his blown ACL in December 2013 made the conversation moot. No injuries, how many rings would Gronk have added to the fingers of his teammates? Gronk’s ripple effect on the rest of the offense is significant. He is an outstanding blocker. The next-best tight end in the game, Jimmy Graham, couldn’t block an internet ad (HA!). And he attracts so much attention that the number of players defenses can allocate to wideouts is reduced. If a team wants to try and take its chances? Their chances are poor. See K.J. Wright in the Super Bowl. That’s not fair.

As far as my final criteria on this list, which is basically the extent to which a player is willing to put the team first, Gronk is interesting. Obviously, he labors as hard as any current professional athlete to cultivate his “brand” and it gets tiresome, predictable and sometimes uncomfortable, like when he supposes the president is drunk. But he serves as comic relief and – even the most skeptical among us – can’t deny that, when it’s time to play he plays. He’s the world’s friendliest, most loyal, most playful Bull Mastiff. An on-field force of nature. And he’s not even halfway done.

Gronk only burnished his on-field legend in 2015 with that otherworldly performance against the Broncos in the AFCCG. But after he mangled his back in 2016, things went awry off the field. He came back in 2017 and a push-pull between he and Bill Belichick over strength and conditioning ensued because Gronk wanted to do more of the TB12 pliability training and fewer weights. That lit the fuse on the budding Belichick-Tom Brady skirmish and the era of bad feeling entered.

Gronk kept turning in brilliant games — the dominant 2017 performance at Pittsburgh; the nine-catch, 116-yard performance against the Eagles in SB52; the work he did in the 2018 AFCCG and Super Bowl win over the Rams.

But after that 2018 season, a battered Gronk prolonged his retirement announcement and submarined the Patriots’ free agent hopes for Jared Cook. And in March 2020, after a year off, he forced his way to Tampa Bay.

Scott Zolak thought Gronk was too low for the first list.

“I look at these ‘planet players’, yellow-jacket players, Hall of Famers?” said Zo. “You look at Rob Gronkowski and his talent. He should be a helluva lot higher than no. 9. He’s the greatest tight end that’s ever played.”

But what about the end? I have that “Patriotism” part of my criteria and Gronk was, after his final game here, actively making things hard for the Patriots.

“Give him a pass on all that stuff,” said Christian Fauria. “If you want to talk about dying with a Patriots jersey on, that element, loyal to a fault? That’s (Julian) Edelman.”

It’s interesting to note that, as this list takes shape, 15 of the players I have in my still-evolving top 30 got at least a little sideways with Belichick. Some a lot more than others. But every other great player, to some degree, had a bout with Bill. That, Ted Johnson says, isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

“(Gronk) was a handful,” said the former Patriots linebacker. “He was a lot at the end. But doesn’t that tell you what Bill Belichick thought of him? Think about that: all the contract negotiations, they had. Think about the injuries that were an issue for Gronk, the parents getting involved. Is there another player that Bill would put up with all that stuff if he wasn’t the elite player he was?

“It shows you how phenomenal of a player and how impactful a player Gronk was when Bill would put up with a lot of what Gronk was doing,” he continued. “And it just tells me that Bill looks at Gronk in a whole different category. Almost like an LT. He was so good that they would put up with it. That’s what Gronk was. The kind of guy who’s in his own special category because that’s how good he was.

“Bill put up with antics and things he never would have with any other player because he knew how special a player he was. That’s how I see it. If you were to put this list together based on how it ended for some of these guys? It would be a weird list. There’s a lot of guys whose tenure didn’t end well but they still deserve to be up there.”

Fair enough. And for the record, after 2015, what were Gronk’s numbers? Fifty games, 213 catches, 3,482 yards and 25 touchdowns. In the playoffs? Another eight games, 48 catches, 636 yards and six TDs.

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New Book Details Kyrie Irving’s Plans To Leave Celtics, Join Kevin Durant With Nets

Irving and Durant first broached the subject of joining forces at Irving’s Weston home in January 2019 – a month before their viral All-Star Game conversation.

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Irving and Durant first broached the subject of joining forces at Irving’s Weston home in January 2019 – a month before their viral All-Star Game conversation.

The basketball world knew something was up when Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant were caught talking together after the 2019 All-Star Game.

With both players set to be free agents after the 2018-19 season, the rumor mill around the two stars joining forces — with Irving breaking his promise to re-sign with the Boston Celtics — blew up.

Of course, that’s what eventually came to pass: Irving reneged on his 2018 pledge to sign long-term with the Celtics and joined Durant on the Brooklyn Nets in free agency that summer. Two years later, their team is in the hunt to compete for an NBA Finals (though Irving is currently hurt).

But a new book shows the first seeds of their future partnership were sewn before their famous All-Star Game chat.

Matt Sullivan, author of the book “Can’t Knock The Hustle,” writes that Irving and Durant first spoke about joining forces in January 2019 — a month before they met at the All-Star Game.

The two reportedly had dinner at Irving’s Weston, Massachusetts home the night before a game between Durant’s Warriors and Irving’s Celtics. During that time, the book says Irving was frustrated at his relationship with his teammates and Boston’s “misperception” of him.

“He didn’t like what his situation was,” KD later said, “and me either in Golden State. And it was just like, ‘Hey, man, let’s just see how this would work. Let’s try it out.’ And [then Los Angeles Clippers center DeAndre Jordan] wanted to play with us to be that center for us that can kinda hold it down, and play for something, really — play for a team that’s going somewhere, not just keep moving around and bouncing around to leave.”

The book also reveals Irving did have misgivings about the history of racism in Boston that he never publicly expressed — until he was about to play in front of a Boston crowd in the playoffs this year for the first time since leaving for the Nets. A friend of Irving’s reportedly said after the fact that it was “a factor” in his departure.

Additionally, the star point guard reportedly battled depression after he lost his grandfather a few weeks after his pronouncement about re-signing with Boston in 2018.

Whatever his reasons, Sullivan wrote that Irving announced his decision to join the Brooklyn Nets to a hometown friend in New Jersey in late May 2019 and officially signed a four-year, $141 million contract with his new team a month later.

After an injury-plagued first season, Irving and Durant’s Nets entered the 2021 playoffs as NBA Finals favorites. They beat the Celtics in their first-round playoff series, but not without plenty of drama surround Irving: the comments about “subtle racism” before Game 3; the stomping on the Celtics logo at the end of Game 4; and a fan throwing a water bottle at Irving shortly after.

To think all that was more than two years in the making.

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Red Sox Notes: Alex Cora Slaps Significant Label On Alex Verdugo

‘There’s a reason he’s hitting second’

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Alex Verdugo often can be overlooked as fans and media members alike fawn over the Red Sox offense.

This isn’t necessarily a slight of Verdugo. J.D. Martinez still is among the game’s best sluggers and Rafael Devers is on his way to becoming one of baseball’s most feared bats. Xander Bogaerts is, well, Xander Bogaerts.

But as Alex Cora explained after Friday’s walk-off win, Verdugo can do it all at the dish.

Verdugo’s latest thing of beauty with the bat: a game-winning knock plastered off the Green Monster that gave Boston a 6-5 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. The heroics prompted Cora to a shine a light on the dynamic young outfielder.

“…There’s a reason he’s hitting second,” Cora said on a video conference after the game. “He’s probably the most complete hitter that we have. He can go the other way, he can hit for average, he can hit for power, he works the counts, you know? That’s the reason he’s hitting second.”

Cora continued: “…I’m very impressed for young he is, the way he controls his at-bats. He goes to the dugout and he’s upset about certain things, but then he slows it down and goes to battle. In left field today he was great. He made some good throws. He played the wall perfectly. Like I said before, this kid — he’s a good one. We got a good one. We just got to keep working with him.”

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